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Features of

Dunorlan Park

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THE FOUNTAIN

Designed by James Pulham, the fountain was displayed at the International Exhibition in 1862 as "The Dunorlan". It's bowl is made of Puhamite and figures made of terracotta. It  had to be remodelled after being used for target practice during World War II.

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THE TERRACE

Once the main entrance to the garden from Dunorlan House, which stood above, Victorian visitors would presume that all of the countryside vista the garden was part of the estate as no garden boundaries could be seen.  The balustrade is made of Bath Yellow Stone and the steps and slabs of Natural Riven York Stone.

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GRECIAN TEMPLE 

Originally an open structure that housed a statue described in 1881 as being Ellen Douglas, the heroine in Sir Walter Scott's work The Lady of the Lake, the Temple is now enclosed by glazed panels. Restoration revealed the original Ancient Greek design painted on the walls which complimented the floors. 

THE ROCKERY

Also made from Pulhamite, the Rockery was designed by James Pulham and Robert Marnock in the 1850s. It is stocked with rhododendrons, tree peonies and dwarf azeleas forming the Park's own Amen Corner.

CASCADE, SUMMERHOUSE AND WATER GARDEN

The Cascade, or waterfall, was made from Pulhamite and sandstone, and designed to look like natural sandstone outcrops.

The Summerhouse was erected by FoDP in memory of our founder, Peter Reynolds, after seeing an image of an earlier summerhouse at this location.

The Water Garden is a series of ponds linked by a stream and is home to a large range of aquatic plants and creatures.

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DID YOU KNOW?

Dunorlan Park is the home of an unsolved crime. In October 2006, the Victorian Statue known as The Dancing Girl by William Theed disappeared from the Park's Temple. The only clues to the thieves were vehicle tracks from the Park entrance to the Temple. The five foot tall statue, valued at over £50,000, has never been recovered.

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CEDAR AVENUE

Described in Victorian times as 'one of the finest Cedar avenues in England', the avenue linking the Temple to the Fountain was originally planted with Deodar cedars and Douglas firs.  The firs were removed when the cedars spread.  48 cedars were replanted in 2004 to renovate the avenue.

CHALYBEATE SPRING

Dunorlan's spring releases chalybeate, a type of water believed in the seventeenth century to cure all manner of ailments. The spring still rises into its stone basin.  This iron tasting water was served at the Pantiles and is responsible for the town's name including the word 'Wells'.

HEY KIDS!  WATCH OUT FOR THE DRAGON...

A relatively new addition to the Park is the ever popular children's play area, watched over by Duncan the Dunorlan Dragon. Hours of fun for kids and parents, with the Dunorlan Park Cafe ideally placed nearby.